You are here



Glasses offer hope to some with reading disorders
Posted October 17, 2012 By WFAA News Dallas/Ft. Worth

More than one in 10 students are dyslexic, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Many endure hours of expensive tutoring or special education to manage the learning difficulty.A dyslexic may see words in a very confusing way: Letters might appear to be backwards, upside-down, jumbled up, or jump off the page.

"It just gave me headaches," said 12-year old Sullivan Sheahan. "I would zone out and then I would try to focus too hard and then I would start seeing double and the words would get blurry." That was before Sullivan slipped on a pair of special shades.

ChromaGen lenses are colored filters that change the wavelength of light going into the eyes. In dyslexics, some experts believe both eyes don't process information at the same speed.

"The lenses work by synchronizing the information between the left and the right eyes, so that it arrives at the brain in a synchronized fashion," explained inventor David Harris. "In that way, it makes reading easier for many people who have difficulty reading.

View the Full Article

If the story does not load up in a new window, check your tabs at the top of your browser.